Challenging orthodoxies in economic thinking in Africa

TrustAfrica (TA) and the Institute for Economic Justice (IEJ) are pleased to announce a three-day convening on Challenging Orthodoxies in Economic Thinking in Africa: Exploring Alternatives. The convening, which is supported by the Open Society Initiative for West Africa (OSIWA)

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Pan African CSO-Side Event at the 53rd S…

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Saying Farewell To Long-Time Staffer Ese Emerhi As She Moves To New Adventures In The Philanthropy Sector

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Project Manager: African Philanthropy After four years with TrustAfrica she is embarking on a new...

World Communities Forum

On 23 and 24 March 2021 the Inaugural World Communities Forum was convened by SHOFCO where the Glo...

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Media and Civil Society Collaborate with…

On 10 and 11 March 2021, TrustAfrica in partnership with the Thomson Reuters Foundation convened 1...

Roundtable on "The challenges of the women's social movement in Senegal, Mali and Burkina Faso: Advancing actions for systemic change supporting women's rights"

Roundtable on "The challenges of th…

As mentioned in our opening article, TrustAfrica, as part of the implementation of its project: “E...

Trustafrica Celebrates International Women's Day

Trustafrica Celebrates International Wom…

This year's International Women’s Day (IWD) theme recognizes the impact of the COVID-19 global hea...

100th Anniversary Amadou Mathar Roundtables

100th Anniversary Amadou Mathar Roundtab…

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CALL FOR CONCEPT NOTES: Strengthening Pa…

Period: April 2021 – September 2021  The COVID-19 pandemic has spread across the globe with the Wor...

Les défis du mouvement social féminin: faire progresser les actions pour un changement systémique en faveur des droits des femmes

Les défis du mouvement social féminin: f…

La mobilisation des femmes en Afrique remonte déjà à leur contestation de l’ordre colonial. Si on ...

MEDIA AND CIVIL SOCIETY CONFERENCE ON ILLICIT FINANCIAL FLOWS (IFFS)  FROM AFRICA IN THE COVID19 ERA

MEDIA AND CIVIL SOCIETY CONFERENCE ON IL…

TrustAfrica and the Thomson Reuters Foundation (TRF), are please to announce their virtual multi-s...

Join us at the inaugural World Communiti…

TrustAfrica is excited the be a thought partner and anchoring member of this inaugural event which...

Launch of joint RECLAIM SUSTAINABILITY! programme for inclusive and sustainable value chains

Launch of joint RECLAIM SUSTAINABILITY! …

Mawuse Hotor (middle) and her parents, Mary Ahotor and Gabriel, cocoa farmers in Ghana  “Engaging...

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The problem with this situation is that there is no definitive guide

ImageWhen one goes to the professional, one expects to invest in his expertise. This investment requires no great leap of faith, as it is supported by a trust acknowledged among the general populace and duly warranted by the traditions of the profession. The standards and practices of an individual professional in the fields of, say, law, medicine, or aviation seldom present any great challenge to their clients’ preconceptions. Strict standards and regimented practices are the baseline assumption for all involved. Moreover, the results of those relationships generally support the ideal.

Unless we’re referring to the design profession. In which case, you can discount all of that.

Design, by comparison to other professions, is an odd and disappointing institution. While design exists as a profession in name at one end of the institutional spectrum, it also exists as a commoditized technical service industry at the other. And this is not necessarily a bad thing; it’s a construct of the market. It’s appropriate only within a very narrow context and far narrower than is generally assumed. But as I’ll argue in detail later, both designers and the public benefit from this commodity service aspect to the industry.

When one goes to the professional, one expects to invest in his expertise. This investment requires no great leap of faith, as it is supported by a trust acknowledged among the general populace and duly warranted by the traditions of the profession. The standards and practices of an individual professional in the fields of, say, law, medicine, or aviation seldom present any g

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